IAM B

art collection

Religious Sculptures



Triptych Virgin Theotokos Hodegetria

/ ‘virgo inter virgines’ /'Throne of wisdom' ; in research

silver repoussé/hammered  late gothic(??) , Byzantine ?? triptych, wood framed 19/20th cent.; sockle late gothic; H. 43 cm x W ( opened) 37 cm x D 2,5 cm; base H. 5cm x W. 19cmxD. 9 cm Holy see or (Byzantine) king with tiara and an orb+cross*; hereunder papal heraldic coat of arms? Virgin  Theotokos Hodegetria with infant Jezus (as pantocrator) with orb with cross  in left hand. Jesus is often seen holding an orb, and it is easy to mistake this for an apple. The orb may be used to represent the world. The orb often shown with a cross on top *(the globus cruciger), symbolises Christ’s dominion over the world, and in the hands of Jesus, it is known as Salvator Mundi (“Saviour of the World”). It is a very old symbol, dating back to the 4 th or 5 th centuries.

Refrnce to painting  with orb painted:

virgin Hodegetria Icon. This icon reproduces an image of the Odighitria, the Virgin who shows the way to salvation. The salvation is Jesus Christ. This icon is one the most ancient iconographic symbols and, according to the tradition, it was originally in Jerusalem and was brought to Russia in the XII century. This icon comes with certificate of authenticity in an elegant blue velvet box with internal satin covering. Weight: 0.20 g - Article Size: Height: 18 cm|Width: 13 cm - Article Materials: wood, egg tempera, golden leaf



St Catharina;



 




















St Catharina; H 60 cm; relief (limetree), Ulm Swabia, southern Germany; Late gotic approx 1500; left hand Cartwheel with long nails; hilt in right hand, sword missing; illegible old label ex Sothebys on backside; Highly important figure of St Catharina, looks like Hans Multscher

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Jezus lamentation A fine German fruitwood group of the Descent from the Cross in early 16th century style,18th or 19th century? Carved in Renaissance style with numerous figures surrounding Christ's body, four figures standing on ladders, on base in Louis XVI style, partly gilt, top left figure missing right arm
height overall 30cm.




 ALBAST, flemish; 17th cent.  carving: Xmass; 10x15 cm; in research

Andreas (st.) wood; polychromed; gilt; H. 32 cm; South Germany, Obergammergau; <1800

Saint Paul holding a book; lacking the sword; wood, polychromed/gilt; Spain, 17th cent. H. 57 x W 15 x D 13 cm

Saint Paul

Madonna with child, Flanders 16/17th cent. inresearch;  wood H. 50 cm

Hungarian pleurant;  brass figurine with child; Foundry mark 'schlick iron  foundry' ( at) Pesten; (Schlick féle masöntode pesten)approx. 1900 H. 50 cm

 Foundrymark

reference another foundry mark in stone.

 

 

Madonna with child; ivory carving; h/ 15 cm; 14th cent ; Köln; Provenance collection Frits Philips; before and not included in auction dec. 2006 sotheby's; in resaerch ex Austria

Oak carving, 15th century; 13,5 x10 x 10 cm; southern Netherlands; polychromed redish/black; Staff 20th cent.

St Martinus ( Nicolas) de Tours; Oak 15th cent. Looks like,  with a not naked  but  fully clothed beggar(?)  at his feet.. However,only on paintings known, a small saluting person is on the feet of a saint/bishop, are  posting as a the donor of a said painting. Very unknown, unique,  is the position of this person in  religious sculpture.  H. approx 40 cm; oak; 15th cent. Staff later period; in research

St, Martin de Tours; oak; H 46x W 16 x D 10 cm; 16th cent., Southern Netherlands*. Note: is normally only to see on paintings : the commissioner ordered to paint is/was also pictured in a said painting down on a corner. Very rare to see the commissioner/donor (?) at the feet of st Martin, See also the sculpture in MET**.

   *Provenance: Erik van Damme, Antwerp, consevator museum Schone kunsten.

Born 316 or 336 died 397; Known also as St Maarten, on horse back sharing his cloak in half; Attributed against alcolism; globe of fire, goose, Swiss guards, beggars, soldiers, tailors, winemakers















St. Martin of Tours, whose feast is November 11, was born in Pannonia of pagan parents around the year 316. He was baptized after forsaking military life, founded a monastery in France under the direction of St. Hilary, and was later chosen bishop of Tours. He was known during his lifetime as an exemplary pastor who educated the clergy, founded monasteries, and preached the gospel to the poor. He died in 397 AD.  The following was written by a contemporary, Sulpicius Severus.

Lit. & References to Sulpicius Severus:

Born around 360 AD in the region of Gaul (modern France) called Aquitaine, Sulpicius Severus was an up and coming lawyer till his wife’s death caused him to pause and take stock of his life. The example of his friend, St. Paulinus of Nola, and the exhortations of St. Martin, bishop of Tours, led to his conversion to the monastic life. He settled on an estate in Southern Gaul and set to work writing the life of St. Martin who was still alive at the time. The work became very influential on later authors writing lives of the saints. According to one author, Sulpicius was ultimately ordained a priest and lived till about 420.

 **Reference Metropolitan museum N.Y.Date: late 15th–early 16th century; person at feet;  Culture: German ;Medium: Wood, polychromy and gilding ; Dimensions: 44 3/4 × 15 1/2 × 6 1/4 in., 18.2 lb. (113.7 × 39.4 × 15.9 cm, 8.2 kg) Classification: Sculpture-Wood ; Credit Line: Gift of Mrs. Russell C. Veit, in memory of her father, Maurice Bompard, 1950 ;Accession Number: 50.233.2

 Wood collumn, flower carvings; H. 102 cm; wings (damaged) 38 cm;  Anglo/saxon?India?Renaissance?New 20th cent? In research

 

A PAIR OF OAK ROMANESQUE retable(?) PILASTERS
15TH CENTURY Each carved with zigzag pattern bands, with later tops, back and plinth
109.5 cm. high] Provance Christies. Retable supports? In research

JEZUS birth; oak carving; 17th cent? diameter approx 25 cm; In research

St John the Baptist, in camelhair tunic; wood, polychromed H. 103 cm; wood; polychrome, lamb; at the feet camel head; Camel hair tunic H. approx 125 cm; 16th cent. Robe Riemenschneider patern a la st maria Magdalena human hair,??in research

St John the Baptist, in camelhair tunic; wood, polychromed H. 103 cm Note the head is lager carved to the body, sculpture suposely must be on a higher place in perspective.

Reference to Morton Stigge, very informative schollary paper: The lion in Romanesque art, meaning or decoration?:......who can only be defeated by the strongest and by the help of God:

HOWEVER a Second observation is made by Richard Starck:  

The statue is of John the Baptist. He wears a camel skin, as in Matthew 3:4, and the sculptor decided to include a camel head at the bottom to make that clear. Matthew also says he used a leather belt, which is clearly shown on the statue. Images of this saint often have him holding a book with a lamb sitting on top of it. The lamb refers to his words upon seeing Jesus, "Behold the Lamb of God, behold him who taketh away the sin of the world" (John 1:29). The lamb is not itself a god; in John's gospel it is a symbol of Christ's giving himself as a sacrifice.

 The disproportionately large head would not be consistent with Riemenschneider's closely observed naturalism, and he seems too serious to have ever put a camel's head on his subject's tunic. He does like to give a subject a somewhat elongated body, but that is a characteristic of Mannerism, which influenced him during the latter part of his life.

 Wriitten by Richard Stracke on 'The lion in Christian iconography' 

KAPITTEL; PILASTER; Wood oak carved ; 60x60xtrapezium 60 cm;roman/corinthical; In research

Oak kapittel/bracket/pilaster; , 60x60x60 cm approx.Lower Rhine???, pierced, carved with scrolling acanthus. In research

Virgin bras gild crown; 1856 1906 celibrations; congregration Des Dames; Diamonds?rose cut, rhinestone?/in star;crown diameter approx 25 cm; in research

engraved...des dames 1856-1906; in research


Virgin, silver crown; gild; 925; hallmarked Utrecht 1935, silversmith jan Bron; in research

 

RETABEL polychrome carved wood relief of the crucified Christ; H 50xw46 cm Northern Europe, possible Baltic. 16th cent? In research;provenance Christies Amsterdam; Jeruzalem sky line.


On tower a Antwerp????mark castel?

 Backside, darkspots om the corners; vertical restoration fault; lit.: Merken opmerken; C. van Vlierden , H de Smedt 1990; p.144>>213; ill; Antwerpse retabels, 15de-16de eeuw; catalogus; Hans Nieuwdorp; 1993.


Christ Descent from cross;                                                                                                                                             oak wood carved relief; polychromed; H 43xw32 cm; 19th cent

lit.: Merken opmerken; C. van Vlierden , H de Smedt 1990; p.144>>213; ill; Antwerpse retabels, 15de-16de eeuw; catalogus; Hans Nieuwdorp; 1993


Christ on cold stone; oak; part Retable ;flemish; H.23 cm 15th cent.

Ref. tekst: # 4478, Museum voor religieuze kunst, Uden NL.

Christus op de Koude Steen

Anvers approx. 1520 oak;. 46 x b 26 cm.

De late middeleeuwen kenmerken zich door een bloei van de volksvroomheid, een devotie gericht op de persoonlijke geloofsbeleving van religieuzen en burgers. In dit tijdvak ziet het getijdenboek het licht, verschijnt het gebedenboek in de volkstaal en komt de overweging op het lijden van Christus centraal te staan in de geloofsbeleving. In dit milieu ontstaan zelfstandige motieven geïnspireerd op de lijdensweg van Christus. Terwijl de kruisweg zich nog moet uitkristalliseren, ziet in Italië de Piëta het licht en in Duitsland de Man van Smarten. In de Nederlanden komt een andere voorstelling van het lijden van Christus tot wasdom: het beeld van de Christus met geboeide handen, eenzaam rustend op een rotsblok, verlaten door iedereen. In eenzaamheid wacht hij op zijn aanstaande kruisiging: de Christus op de Koude Steen. Christus wordt zittend afgebeeld, geboeid, gekleed in een lendendoek, terwijl zijn mantel, waar spoedig om gedobbeld zal worden, vaak nog naast hem ligt. Soms zijn de benen gekruist, veelal niet. De wat wonderlijke naam, 'op de Koude Steen', gaat terug op de Vita Christi van veertiende-eeuwse auteur Ludolf van Sachsen: 'O lieve heere hoe jammerlyck sadt gy opten kouden steen, beevender van grote koude ende pynen.' Naast monumentale beelden, waarvan er enkele zijn overgeleverd, moeten er ook talrijke kleine devotiebeeldjes in circulatie zijn geweest. Dit bijzonder exemplaar moet omstreeks 1510-1520 in Antwerpen - het beeld voert het Antwerpse keur- uit eikenhout gesneden zijn. Wie precies de maker is valt moeilijk te zeggen, maar zeker is dat hier sprake is van een virtuoos meester die op de hoogte was van de ontwikkelingen op het gebied van de beeldhouwkunst in het Brabantse en tevens vertrouwd moet zijn geweest met het beeldhouwklimaat in het Nederrrijnse, zoals te zien in Kalkar en Xanten.

front

backside

Russian cross;

Brass, gilt filigrain cross; corals Chabuson cut rubies?garnet? on front part ; approx.  22x10 cm .each side 6 wood  relief carvings of 20x15 mm , presumeably palmwood; of the high events in the live of Jezus. Southtern? Russia? Ukraine? Ex Kolisch collection 1999 sale  in research.

.  Reference lit. crosses with wood carvings :

In Europe, one of the most noteworthy collectors in the 20th century is Leopold Leo Kollisch (1910-1997), a Hungarian who owned a shipping firm in Rotterdam. From 1950 to 1970, he obtained many unique crosses and crucifixes from flea markets in Italy, France, and Spain . Sothebys auctioned The Kolisch Collection of Crosses and Crucifixes in 1999 and 2000. The two auction catalogs provide a fascinating tour of folk and liturgical pieces from the 16th through the 19th century.

Kollisch wrote in 1953 that he collected crosses for the following reasons:

As a small boy I was often impressed by the crucifix. In my native country of Hungary, there were crucifixes along the main roads, at the edge of the forest, even in small villages and hamlets; roughly carved images of primitive devotion...Because of political confusion, misleading propaganda aimed at broad masses of people in many countries, man is drifting away from good; a single, often weather-worn crucifix somewhere along the road in our day will sometimes perform more missionary work than legions of priests or preachers. Let us openly admit that in the most difficult times of our lives, the only secure point of hope for the future and resignation to our present fate, is granted us through a crucifix. Such confrontations with the cross, with a Corpus Christi, were the reason, and later inspiration behind collecting crucifixes.(2)



 Palmtreewood carving; Ill de France 17th cent.; Frame 19th cent? inresearch

SERAPH

Spanish Baroque polychrome and giltwood SERAPH corpus Christie; 17th cent. Carved almost full round; Christ of good anatomy, with lowered head, long hair, beard and side wound'His arms and legs set with wings. H. 28 cm

A seraph corpus like this relates to the vision of st. Francis which was a man like a Seraph with six wings. His armd outstreched and feet together in the shapeof a vross. While contemplating It themarks of Christ wounds appeared on the saint's body, where they remained until His death two years later.Provenance; Sothebys Amsterdam Kolisch collection, October 1999, lot 52

ill.Alternative Titles: burning one, seraphim

Seraph, plural seraphim,  in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic literature, celestial being variously described as having two or three pairs of wings and serving as a throne guardian of God. Often called the burning ones, seraphim in the Old Testament appear in the Temple vision of the prophet Isaiah as six-winged creatures praising God in what is known in the Greek Orthodox church as the Trisagion (“Thrice Holy”): “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts; the whole earth is full of his glory” (Isaiah 6:3). In Christian angelology the seraphim are the highest-ranking celestial beings in the hierarchy of angels.

In art the four-winged cherubim are painted blue (symbolizing the sky) and the six-winged seraphim red (symbolizing fire). Comparecherub

 Silver UK(?) reliquary; hallmarked; in research. Marks: griffin ; sterling UK lion; silversmith?, place of hallmarking(London?) Faux hallmarking; presumeable 1900


Peruvian  ceramic RETABLE, wood painted case; Folk art; ABOUT PERUVIAN RETABLOS
The Ayacuchan Retablo is one of the most acknowledged art expressions and an example of the high level of mastery achieved by artisans of the town of Ayacucho, Peru. The origin of the Ayacuchan retablo goes back to the Colonial era, where Spanish priests traveled to evangelize all the towns of the Peruvian highlands, carrying articulated boxes with images of several catholic saints to make them known to the population. These were called San Marcos Boxes and were taken as a reference by artisans who made the retablos. During the 1940’s, the creation of these art pieces started, by using the San Marcos boxes as a reference to design sceneries with various themes related to traditionalist motifs, such as bullfighting, cockfights, traditional dances and parties, rural scenes and agrarian works. The artisans from the Ayacucho town adapted the new boxes and made them their own, changing their name to Retablos (altarpieces). in research

St. Lucas, polycromed wood sculpture; in research

 

Virgin with child both holding an  orb; 'Seat of wisdom (sedes sapientiae); H. 27 cm; Avesnesstone (?); late romain ;15th cent.  ??

References to sculpture 'Romaanse kunst', Rolf Toman,1996; page 257, ill. 'kapiteel' in research

 

Avesnesstone?  Virgin (?) with orb;  'Seat of wisdom (sedes sapientiae); presumeably Flemish, 15th cent. ??; in research

 Bronze  <19th cent(?) of a saint; in research

 carvings; 3 kings; standing  on children's heads; H. 3 cm

Houdon; Jean-Antoine Houdon , 1741-1828 LA FRILEUSE;Ceramic/terracotta /tinted plaster  H. 71 cm; approx 1810; bears signature;Shrinkage terra cotta 4-15% (11%=30% less mass) after surmoulage marbre model original;See also for Houdon sculptures. Presumeably late 19th cent.

 and on background Magdalena; wood polychromed ;18th cent. H. 80 cm

 

Magdalena, Maria polychromed wood; 18th cent. H. 80 cm; 14 nothelfer;bears monogramm??

 

Statuette : Pleurant n° 55 du tombeau de Jean sans Peur ; H. 19 cm; bronze. Museumshop?

Ref.:

Auteur : Huerta, Jean de La Date de création : 1443 / 1455  Auteur : Le Moiturier, Antoine Date de création : 1466 / 1470

Albâtre

Hauteur : 40,8 cm ; Largeur : 18 cm ; Profondeur : 15 cm
Inv. CA 1417 n° 55

Comme le suggèrent les sources, c'est probablement La Huerta qui a réalisé le plus grand nombre des pleurants du tombeau de Jean sans Peur, puisque le contrat de Le Moiturier, en 1461, le charge de "parfaire, polir et achever les plourans". Pierre Quarré, dans ses expositions consacrées à Jean de La Huerta et Antoine Le Moiturier, a proposé de les départager en attribuant à La Huerta "ceux qui présentent une attitude mouvementée ou des effets de drapés avec remous de plis", et à Le Moiturier les personnages "à l'attitude calme, au drapéd'une grande sobriété, aux visages d'un modelé lumineux". il est indéniable, en effet, que certains pleurants se situent, par la générosité de leur drapé, dans la mouvance slutérienne, tandis qu'une conception plus simple s'exprime dans d'autres. Mais il faut observer que les deux sculpteurs ne se sont, comme l'impliquait la commande de Philippe le Bon, finalement guère démarqués du modèle donné par le tombeau de Philippe le Hardi. Certains pleurants sont les copies littérales de ceux de Philippe le Hardi, et ceux qui s'en démarquent restent dans le même esprit. Dans ces conditions, il est délicat de tenter d'attribuer les pleurants à l'un ou l'autre des sculpteurs intervenus sur le tombeau.

(Notice de Sophie Jugie extraite de « L'Art à la cour de Bourgogne : Le mécénat de Philippe le Hardi et de Jean sans Peur (1364-1419) », Dijon : Musée des Beaux-Arts, 28 mai - 15 septembre 2004, Cleveland : The Cleveland Museum of Art, 24 octobre 2004 - 9 janvier 2005)

Historique : Collection Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon ; Collection Dijon, cathédrale Saint-Bénigne

Attribution du Conseil Général de la Côte d'Or, 1827. L'oeuvre est classée au titre des monuments historiques depuis 1862.

Oeuvres en lien : CA 1417 Tombeau de Jean sans Peur et Marguerite de Bavière Ensemble 2012-2-1-28 Planche 28 : pleurant n° 55



Statuette Pleurant n° 71 du tombeau de Jean sans Peur ; bronze 19 cm; Museumshop?

REF:



Statuette  Auteur : Huerta, Jean de La
Date de création : 1443 / 1455  Auteur : Le Moiturier, Antoine
Date de création : 1466 / 1470
Albâtre
Hauteur : 41,5 cm ; Largeur : 21 cm ; Profondeur : 10 cm
Museé Inv. CA 1417 n° 71

Comme le suggèrent les sources, c'est probablement La Huerta qui a réalisé le plus grand nombre des pleurants du tombeau de Jean sans Peur, puisque le contrat de Le Moiturier, en 1461, le charge de "parfaire, polir et achever les plourans". Pierre Quarré, dans ses expositions consacrées à Jean de La Huerta et Antoine Le Moiturier, a proposé de les départager en attribuant à La Huerta "ceux qui présentent une attitude mouvementée ou des effets de drapés avec remous de plis", et à Le Moiturier les personnages "à l'attitude calme, au drapéd'une grande sobriété, aux visages d'un modelé lumineux". il est indéniable, en effet, que certains pleurants se situent, par la générosité de leur drapé, dans la mouvance slutérienne, tandis qu'une conception plus simple s'exprime dans d'autres. Mais il faut observer que les deux sculpteurs ne se sont, comme l'impliquait la commande de Philippe le Bon, finalement guère démarqués du modèle donné par le tombeau de Philippe le Hardi. Certains pleurants sont les copies littérales de ceux de Philippe le Hardi, et ceux qui s'en démarquent restent dans le même esprit. Dans ces conditions, il est délicat de tenter d'attribuer les pleurants à l'un ou l'autre des sculpteurs intervenus sur le tombeau.

(Notice de Sophie Jugie extraite de « L'Art à la cour de Bourgogne : Le mécénat de Philippe le Hardi et de Jean sans Peur (1364-1419) », Dijon : Musée des Beaux-Arts, 28 mai - 15 septembre 2004, Cleveland : The Cleveland Museum of Art, 24 octobre 2004 - 9 janvier 2005)

Historique : Collection Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon ; Collection Dijon, cathédrale Saint-Bénigne Attribution du Conseil Général de la Côte d'Or, 1827. L'oeuvre est classée au titre des monuments historiques depuis 1862.  Oeuvres en lien : CA 1417 Tombeau de Jean sans Peur et Marguerite de Bavière Ensemble ;2012-2-2-20 Planche 20 : pleurant n° 71

Ref: Rijlksmuseum in collections 10 pleurants.Pleurants van het praalgraf van Isabella van Bourbon, Jan Borman (II) (toegeschreven aan), Renier van Thienen (toegeschreven aan), ca. 1475 - ca. 1476

In 1465 overleed Isabella van Bourbon, de vrouw van Karel de Stoute, hertog van Bourgondië. Hun dochter Maria liet voor haar een praalgraf maken in de Michielsabdij in Antwerpen. Om de tombe stonden 24 beeldjes van rouwende familieleden en voorouders, zogenoemde pleurants. Ze symboliseerden het belang van de Bourgondische dynastie.  

Wikipedia:Het werk is gemaakt in Brussel door de bronsgieter Renier van Thienen de Oude, vermoedelijk naar houten modellen van de beeldsnijder Jan Borreman. Zeker acht van de pleuranten zijn gespiegelde en aangepaste kopieën van deze bij het verdwenen praalgraf van Lodewijk van Male in de Rijselse Sint-Pieterskerk. Dit werk was in 1455 uitgevoerd door de Brusselse geelgieter Jacob van Gerines en gepolychromeerd door Rogier van der Weyden, naar beelden van Jean de le Mer uit Doornik.

De bronzen gisant van Isabella lag op een rechthoekige sarcofaag uit zwart marmer, verfraaid met engelen, heraldische wapens en platen met grafschriften. Haar golvende haar vloeit los vanonder een gepareld diadeem. De plooienval van haar kleed lijkt toe te behoren aan een rechtopstaande figuur. Aan haar voeten bevinden zich twee dashonden, symbool van trouw aan vader en echtgenoot.

De sarcofaag was geheel omringd door 24 pleuranten op een voetstuk, elk zo'n 55 cm hoog. De klederdracht van de beeldjes weerspiegelt een mode die ouder is dan die van de tijd van Isabella. Ze stellen niet haar naaste familieleden voor maar haar voorvaderen. Twee ervan zijn geïdentificeerd als keizer Lodewijk van Beieren (met keizerskroon en rijksappel) en Albrecht van Beieren, zijn derde zoon, met het kruis van Sint-Antonius rond de hals. De pleuranten zijn geen zuivere uitdrukking van verdriet en rouw meer, maar stralen ook de macht van de dynastie uit.

Het geheel is niet alleen van belang vanwege de hoge en verfijnde kwaliteit, maar ook omdat het inzicht geeft in de Bourgondische hofcultuur. De hoofse mode, met opvallende tuyten, houppelandes en puntschoenen, is fraai vertegenwoordigd in de gevarieerde uitdossing van de figuren.

Herkomst en geschiedenis

Tijdens de beeldenstorm van 1566 werd de tombe van Isabella beschadigd en kreeg haar beeltenis houwen in het gelaat. Op een gravure uit de 17e eeuw is te zien dat de bronzen beeldjes op drie na verdwenen waren. [1] Bij de verkoop van de Sint-Michielsabdij als nationaal goed in de Franse tijd werd het graf verwijderd. De loden kist met stoffelijke resten werd overgebracht naar de kapel van het Stadhuis, waaruit ze later spoorloos verdween. Het praalgraf zelf werd tentoongesteld in het Museum van de Academie. Later kreeg het een plaats in de kooromgang van de Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal. In 2009 is het grafbeeld van Isabella door het KMSKA in bruikleen gegeven aan het Museum M.

Ondertussen waren in 1681 tien van de verdwenen beeldjes terug opgedoken in Amsterdam. Pieter de Vos, klerk van het secretariaat, verkocht ze in 1691 aan het stadsbestuur tegen een lijfrente van 150 gulden per jaar. Blijkbaar had de Vos ze geërfd van zijn vader. Ze werden bekend als de 'gravenbeeldjes' omdat men dacht dat ze graven van Holland voorstelden. In 1887 zijn ze in bruikleen gegeven aan het Rijksmuseum. Het duurde nog tot 1951 vooraleer hun herkomst kon worden achterhaald, dankzij de naspeuringen van Jaap Leeuwenberg.


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St. Christophoros 19th-20th cent ?. H 42 cm; monogrammed AK

 


Cristophoros monogrammed AK 18th cent?

 

Maria on snake polychromed; 18th cent. H 56 cm

 carving; H5 cm; polychroom; 17th cent

Hagar presenting to Abraham, oak carving wood panel; 24x35 cm; oak; 17th cent.



Pomona and Vertumnus. Vertumnus appears like an old woman for tempting the young Pomona; cement guss?? copied after, sur moulage?? sold

Pomona's bears monogramm AG sold

Distress God sold

Distress God/ Pieta   Ceramic stone tablet  (gevelsteen) ; 26x39 cm dated 1811; traces polychromed/gilt sold

Wood bone virgin with child; polycrome; height +/- 20 cm; in research




Tilman Riemenschneider(? presumeably) st. John (evangelist/preacher) wood; H. 60 cm  ; Christies 2004;  Provenance Landgut Freiherr Alfons

Lit./references:Tilman Rimenschneider and his workshop;Jörg Rosenfeld et al; 2004;  p.136; ill 203

www.arthistoricum.net/service/myarthistoricumnet/

http://www.arthistoricum.net/service/myarthistoricumnet/

A Lower Rhenish (?) polychrome oak figure of Saint John the Evangelist 16th century

Tilman Riemenschneider was born around the year 1460 at Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld in present-day Thuringia

When Riemenschneider was about five years old, his father was involved in a violent political conflict, the Mainzer Stiftsfehde [de], so the family had to leave Heiligenstadt and all their possessions. They resettled in Osterode, where his father became Master of the Mint (a good position at that time) and where Riemenschneider spent his childhood years.

Riemenschneider likely came to Würzburg for the first time at the age of 18 in 1478/9.  His uncle served as notary and financial advisor to the bishop there, but he did not stay for long. Around 1473, Riemenschneider learned the trade of sculpting and woodcarving, likely in Swabia or the Upper Rhine — possibly in Strasbourg and/or Ulm. At that time, the statutes of the guild of sculptors required that an apprentice travel to many different workshops to gain experience. Very little is known about this period of his life, but he likely came in contact with the work of Martin Schongauer, whose copper engravings served him later as examples.

In 1483, he settled in Würzburg.  On 7 December 1483, he joined the Saint Luke's Guild of painters, sculptors, and glass workers as a painter's assistant. On 28 February 1485, he married Anna Schmidt (born Uchenhofer), a widow of a master goldsmith with three sons. This marriage not only brought him property, but it also meant that he could end his apprenticeship and become a master craftsman.

Also in 1485, Riemenschneider became a citizen of Würzburg, which made it possible to attain the status of master craftsman, and opened a workshop in Franziskanergasse, in the home of his wife. 

The Würzburg sculptor and woodcarver Tilman Riemenschneider (c.1460-1531) worked within established formal traditions, yet succeeded in creating works of a kind that had never been seen before. Against common practice, he left many of his sculptures unpainted. This turned them from life-like images of saints into works of art far removed from the everyday world of the beholder. To see the intricate, supremely carved details of Riemenschneider’s sculptures, the play of light and shade on their glazed wooden surfaces, and the moving expressions of the figures’ faces and gestures, is as fascinating today as it must have been when they were created

Provenance: Landgut freiherr Alphons , Sotheby's 080904; As human said, Tilman Riemenschneider was born around the year 1460 at Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld in present-day Thuringia

When Riemenschneider was about five years old, his father was involved in a violent political conflict, the Mainzer Stiftsfehde [de], so the family had to leave Heiligenstadt and all their possessions. They resettled in Osterode, where his father became Master of the Mint (a good position at that time) and where Riemenschneider spent his childhood years.

Riemenschneider likely came to Würzburg for the first time at the age of 18 in 1478/9.  His uncle served as notary and financial advisor to the bishop there, but he did not stay for long. Around 1473, Riemenschneider learned the trade of sculpting and woodcarving, likely in Swabia or the Upper Rhine — possibly in Strasbourg and/or Ulm. At that time, the statutes of the guild of sculptors required that an apprentice travel to many different workshops to gain experience. Very little is known about this period of his life, but he likely came in contact with the work of Martin Schongauer, whose copper engravings served him later as examples.

In 1483, he settled in Würzburg.  On 7 December 1483, he joined the Saint Luke's Guild of painters, sculptors, and glass workers as a painter's assistant. On 28 February 1485, he married Anna Schmidt (born Uchenhofer), a widow of a master goldsmith with three sons. This marriage not only brought him property, but it also meant that he could end his apprenticeship and become a master craftsman.

Also in 1485, Riemenschneider became a citizen of Würzburg, which made it possible to attain the status of master craftsman, and opened a workshop in Franziskanergasse, in the home of his wife.


Riemenschneider, Tilman References

  1.  

· Kalden-Rosenfeld, Iris, Tilman Riemenschneider--the Sculptor and His Workshop, Königstein im Taunus: Karl Robert Langewiesche Nachfolger Hans Köster Verlagsbuchhandler KG,20004, ISBN 3-7845-3223-3; p. 86 and illustration, cat. no. 101

· · Tilman Riemenschneider - Werke seiner Blütezeit (German). Freunde Mainfränkischer Kunst und Geschichte e.V. Würzburg. 2004.

· · for this and other dating, see loc cit, p. 132 and following.

4.       · Dettelbacher, Werner (1974). Franken - Kunst, Geschichte und Landschaft (German). Dumont Verlag. ISBN 3-7701-0746-2.

External links




 St. Martha (sister of Lazerus and Maria) 18th cent. wood; H.48xW25cm; 2 angels; stemming from


read label, early 18th cent. (in research): Heilige Martha.
Herkunft Kapelle
Unter ... thal
1sre Hälfte 18 Jahrhundert
Welkommen.Guegenmalz???

Fasseing???


st Joseph with child; wood 18th cent. H.43cm; silver? auriol;

Black virgin of Montserrat; with child; Spain Catalonia; plolychromed/gilt wood; H35 cm;  15x15 cm19h cent.?

'Seat of wisdom (sedes sapientiae)'

Reference:

Our Lady of Montserrat or the Virgin of Montserrat (Catalan: Mare de Déu de Montserrat) is a Marian title associated with a venerated statue of the Madonna and Child venerated at the Santa Maria de Montserrat monastery on the Montserrat Mountain in Catalonia, Spain. She is the Patron Saint of Catalonia,[1][2] an honour she shares with Saint George (Sant Jordi in Catalan).[3][4] The famed image once bore the inscription ''Nigra Sum Sed Formosa" (Latin: I am Black, but Beautiful).

Movable Sculpture
Certain sculptures in the medieval period were designed specifically for mobility. Contemporary written sources relate that they were
carried in procession in celebration of feast days. They were often taken to different locations to encourage donations for the repair or rebuilding
of a church. In times of war they could be paraded around the town walls to ward off invaders. Sculptures might also "preside"at synods,
and moving an important image to a new location helped to assert monastic territorial claims. Sometimes  a concealed cylindrical cavity.

Pope Leo XIII granted the image a Canonical coronation on 11 September 1881. The image is one of the Black Madonnas of Europe, hence its familiar Catalan name, La Moreneta ("the little dark-skinned one" or "the little dark one"). Believed by some to have been carved in Jerusalem in the early days of the Church, it is more likely a Romanesque sculpture in wood from the late 12th century.

An 18th century polychromed statue of the same image is also displayed in Saint Peter's basilica, previously stored in the Vatican Museums which was gifted by the President of Brazil, Joao Goulart on the Papal election of Pope Paul VI in 1963. The image has been on display for Papal masses since the Pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI.

"La Moreneta"

The mountain of Montserrat has been of religious significance since pre-Christian times, when the Romans built a temple to honor the Roman goddess Venus.  By one account, the image of the Madonna was moved to Montserrat in 718, to avoid the danger posed by invading Saracens. Legend has it that the Benedictine monks could not move the statue to construct their monastery, choosing to instead build around it. The statue's sanctuary is located at the rear of the chapel, where an altar of gold surrounds the icon, and is now a site of pilgrimage. Description:The 95-cm (38-inch) statue shows evidence of Byzantine conventional and stylized form, and is painted in polychrome. The reliquary statue of Sainte-Foy in Conques (southern France) may have been a model. The art historical designation for this type of pose is called "Throne of Wisdom". The body is thin, the face elongated. She holds an orb of the earth in her right hand. The Child's hand is raised in a formalized and traditional Eastern blessing.

In 2001 renovators working for the government observed that the black hands and face of La Moreneta had over the centuries undergone a change in colour. They attribute the change—from a lighter tone to black—either to prolonged exposure to candle smoke or a chemical reaction caused by a varnish used as a paint sealant. The statue was repainted black by successive generations of restorers. A series of tests, including X-rays, revealed the statue's original colour and also showed that the last repainting took place at the turn of the 18th century. Veneration:After making a pilgrimage to Our Lady of Montserrat around 1203, Peter Nolasco went to Barcelona where he began to practice various works of charity. Nolasco became concerned with the plight of Christians captured in Moorish raids and that he decided to establish a religious order to succor these unfortunates. Upon his recovery from battle wounds, Ignatius of Loyola visited the Benedictine monastery of Montserrat (on 25 March 1522), where he laid down his military accouterments before the image. He then led a period of asceticism before later founding the Society of Jesus. The hymn to the Virgin of Montserrat, known as "el Virolai" and sung at noon each day by the Escolania de Montserrat boys' choir, begins with the words: "Rosa d’abril, Morena de la serra..." (April rose, dark-skinned lady of the mountain...). Therefore, this virgin is sometimes also known as the "Rosa d'abril". Her feast is kept on April 27.


Arresting Christ; polychrome terracotta; flemish; 17th cent;H.40xW36xD22cm;  

Retabel ; A POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA GROUP OF THE ARREST OF CHRIST

FLEMISH, 17TH CENTURY;

A POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA GROUP OF THE ARREST OF CHRIST
FLEMISH, 17TH CENTURY
On a naturalistic base, minor losses to the decoration and the extremities
38 cm. high xW36 x  D 22 cm

Provenance:

Provenance antique exhibition, Delft 1964;

Christies Amsterdam 2010; Collection Mr. N. Schretlen, Amsterdam.
Acquired from Paul Brandt, Amsterdam
.

lit.: Merken opmerken; C. van Vlierden , H de Smedt 1990; p.144>>213; ill; Antwerpse retabels, 15de-16de eeuw; catalogus; Hans Nieuwdorp; 1993




Christ wood; H.24 cm+socle 8 cm; silver(?) auriol; 19th cent.


Maria Notre Dame de Lourdes; bronze /gilded ; ivory hands and face; H.24 cm; sig. G. Omerth


Biography  to  Georges Omerth: 1895-1925;

                       Practically nothing is known of this talented sculptor, not even his nationality; although, he is believed to be of French or possibly Belgian origin.  He is probably best known for his bronzes and chryselephantine figurines and statuettes that often depict young children.  Omerth was very versatile as a sculptor.  He production range includes animalier* pieces in the form of dogs and deer, French military subjects, art nouveau* bronzes usually featuring women in hats and bonnets, and art deco* sporting statues produced in the 1920s and 1930s depicting tennis, football and golf players.

  >450 auction quotes to date.

references to another one:... certificate of certified appraisal office Ruyten, expert Jan Willem Ruyten . The provider guarantees that the ivory is from before 1947 and so it is allowed according to the CITES regulations


 

St Roch;H. 84 cm; 18th cent.  

An oak and polychrome group of Saint Roch, Northern French

first half 17th century

An oak and polychrome group of Saint Roch, Northern French

first half 17th century carved in full round on a rectangular plinth, an angel showing the sore on the Saint's thigh, right arm and left hand missing
71.5cm. high.


 Maria Pyraneén; 15th cent. H 46 cm+socle 5 cm;


Little Jezus Terracotta and paper maché; christ child, with holy hart; 18/19th cent. H.63 cm;


Distress christ / Pieta, seated virgin;  northern france; nutwood; 16th cent. H80xW45 cm;


Maria with child; walnutwood;



 

Joseph with child; german; H 50 cm; 18/19th cent.


St Martines on horse; 18/19th cent; polychromed[ H. 29 cm; 09.04.10


 

Christ baptized in the river Jordan; 18th cent. H 52 cm; 16.04.12

.


Angel; 17/18 th cent. H. 77 cm;  

Ref. lit: Medivial sculptures at the cloister; William Wixom MoMa

Angel. Carved in the round out of solid block of wood, once bore upward trailing wings fitted into the sockets at the shoulders and were originally painted in rich colors and gold, It may be compared to a group of angels from the Pas-de Calais region of Artois. The best known examples, preserved in Normandy in the churces at Humbert and Saudemont. Such works, in set of six, were placed around an altar, they stood on top of tall colonnettes that supported rods for hanging curtains. Thisarrangement is depicted in panel paintings and illuminated manuscrips such as the 'très riches hueres' whhere angels on collumns are holding candesticks. The high goticstyle of cloisters figure derives from the stone sculptures carved on the exterior of Reims Cathedral Retained from such monumental figures are the enigmatic smiles, high-arched eyebrows, puffy lids, smooth cheeks and pointed chins aswel ashe tight hair curls bound by a norrow ribbon or fillet.


 

Ecco Homo Man of sorrows; Christ; bound hands, Spain; 54 cm; 18th cent. lime wood


Maria, Reliquary with shrine, Jezus umbilical cord(?) ; German 17th cent. Barok; H.57 cm;


Petrus; wood; german;  16th cent. H. 66cm;


Maria, wood, polychrome; H 33 cm;



Christ bust; Brabant
15/16th cent'H37xw45xd24 cm;


 

Christ with cross, feet on putti;  Spain;44x25 cm; 17th cent. french nutwood; en bas carving 28.06.2017


 

Vienna pest collumn, Wiener pestsaüle;Holz; +/- 50 cm. Partly originally gilded/ contemporary gold paint; 19th century. Missing the normal glass covering


 salvator mundi; 17th cent. H. 48 cm


 

Pantaleon 71x22x16 cm   cephalophoric saint; nothelfer;

Die Vierzehn Nothelfer Pantaleon

Pantaleon (Heiliger)

Pantaleon (altgr. Παντελεήμων Panteleimon; * Mitte des 3. Jahrhunderts in Nikomedia; † 27. Juli 305) ist ein frühchristlicher Märtyrer und Heiliger. Er gehört zu den vierzehn Nothelfern und ist der Patron der Ärzte und Hebammen. Ursprünglich hieß er Pantaleon, zu Deutsch „Ganzer Löwe“. Der Name Panteleimon, übersetzt „Der ganz Barmherzige“ oder „Allerbarmer“, wurde dem Gemarterten der Überlieferung nach von Gott verliehen. Sein Gedenktag ist der 27. Juli.

Leben

Der Legende nach war Pantaleon der Sohn einer Christin und eines Heiden. Er wurde von Euphrosynus, dem Leibarzt des Kaisers Maximian, in der Heilkunst unterwiesen. Doch auch der Priester Hermolaus nahm sich des jungen Pantaleon an und führte ihn zum christlichen Glauben. Nachdem es ihm gelungen war, ein durch einen Schlangenbiss zu Tode gekommenes Kind durch das Gebet wiederzuerwecken, ließ er sich schließlich von dem Alten taufen. Als er darauf einen Blinden unter Anrufung Jesu Christi wieder sehend machte, war auch sein Vater bekehrt.

Pantaleon wurde vom Kaiser zu seinem Leibarzt ernannt. Aber andere Ärzte, die neidisch auf ihn waren, da er Menschen kraft seines Glaubens heilte, denunzierten ihn bei dem Herrscher als einen, der den Christengott verehre. Maximian beredete Pantaleon nun, wieder den alten Göttern zu opfern. Doch dieser schlug vor, ihm einen Kranken zu bringen, bei dem alle Heilkunst bisher versagt hat, damit er an ihm die Wahrheit zeige. Man holte einen Lahmen herbei und Pantaleon brachte ihn im Namen Christi zum Gehen. Daraufhin befahl der Kaiser, Pantaleon zu martern. Doch der widerstand den Nägeln, mit denen man ihn zerfleischte, dem Feuer, mit dem man ihn brannte und dem flüssigen Blei, in das man ihn tauchte. Auch dass er, auf ein Rad geflochten, einen Berg hinabrollen musste, konnte ihm nichts anhaben. Und die wilden Tiere, die ihn zerreißen sollten, wurden zahm. Endlich rief der Kaiser die Soldaten, Pantaleon zu enthaupten. Bevor sie diesen aber töteten, bat er den Herrn – die Hände waren ihm auf den Kopf genagelt –, seinen Mördern zu vergeben. Da erscholl eine Stimme vom Himmel, dass es geschehe und er nicht mehr Pantaleon, sondern Panteleimon heißen solle, damit Name und Tat gleich seien. Als sie ihm den Kopf abgeschlagen hatten, floss aus seiner Wunde Milch statt Blut, und der Baum, an den sie ihn gebunden hatten, war auf einmal überladen von Früchten. Die Soldaten, die ihn am Ende verehrten und die er hatte drängen müssen, ihren Auftrag zu erfüllen, kehrten nicht wieder zum Kaiser zurück.

Verehrung

Die Verehrung des heiligen Pantaleon ist in der Ostkirche seit Ende des 4. Jahrhunderts belegt. Bereits Theodoret von Cyrus bezeugt eine Festfeier zu Ehren des heiligen Pantaleon und unter Justinian wurde ihm in Konstantinopel erstmals eine Kirche geweiht. Ausgehend vom orientalischen Raum, in dem er die bedeutendste Devotion erfuhr, breitete sich sein Kult ab dem 8. Jahrhundert auch im Abendland aus. In Rom lässt sich seine Verehrung bereits um 708 nachweisen. Kultisches Zentrum und Ausgangspunkt der abendländischen Pantaleonsverehrung war jedoch Köln. Hier wurde im Jahre 866 das erste Pantaleon-Patrozinium auf ostfränkischem Boden errichtet, sodass davon ausgegangen werden kann, dass schon damals Reliquien des Heiligen nach Köln gelangt waren. In seiner Weltchronik behauptet der Benediktinermönch und Chronist Sigebert von Gembloux, dass erste Übertragungen von Pantaleonreliquien ins Frankenreich bereits im Jahre 802 erfolgt seien.[6] Vieles spricht dafür, dass der Pantaleonskult aus dem gallo-fränkischen Raum ins Rheinland gelangt ist.[6] Vermutlich sind diese ersten Reliquien, die für das Patrozinium des zu Ehren des heiligen Pantaleon errichteten Gotteshauses in Köln erforderlich waren, während des Normannensturms 881/882 verloren gegangen.[6] Doch könnten im 10. Jahrhundert weitere Reliquienübertragungen als Geschenk des byzantinischen Kaisers Johannes I. Tzimiskes bei der Vermählung seiner Nichte Theophanu mit Kaiser Otto II. ins Römisch-Deutsche Reich gelangt sein.[7] Als Erzbischof Brun von Köln, der Bruder Ottos I., um 955 bei der inzwischen stark baufällig gewordenen Kirche St. Pantaleon in Köln ein Benediktinerkloster gründete, erfuhr der Pantaleonskult einen Aufschwung. Außerdem war Kaiserin Theophanu, die diese neu gegründete, dem heiligen Pantaleon geweihte Benediktinerabtei mit zahlreichen Schenkungen unterstützte, wohl sehr daran gelegen, die Verehrung eines Heiligen aus ihrer griechischen Heimat zu fördern.[8] Da sowohl Theophanu als auch Klostergründer Brun auf eigenen Wunsch hin in der Krypta der dem heiligen Pantaleon geweihten Kirche in Köln bestattet wurden, wurde die Verehrung des Heiligen zusätzlich gefördert. Von Köln aus verbreitete sich der Kult um den griechischen Märtyrer durch zahlreiche Reliquientranslationen im 11. und 12. Jahrhundert weiter, erfuhr nach einer erneuten Erhebung der Gebeine im Jahre 1208 einen Aufschwung und erreichte mit der Aufnahme des heiligen Pantaleon in die Gruppe der vierzehn Nothelfer im 14. Jahrhundert seinen Höheunkt. Pantaleon gehört – wie Cosmas und Damian und wie Cyrus – zu einer Gruppe von Heiligen, die „heilige Geldverächter“ genannt werden, griechisch: Agioi Anárgyroi (Άγιοι Ανάργυροι), weil sie sich von ihren (armen) Patienten für ihre ärztlichen Dienste nicht entlohnen ließen.

Dargestellt wird der heilige Pantaleon oft in seiner Funktion als Arzt mit Salbbüchse und Arztbesteck als Attributen. So erscheint er bis heute auf dem Siegel der Medizinischen Fakultät der Universität zu Köln, das seit 1393 in Gebrauch ist. Daneben wird er auch mit einer Märtyrerpalme und an einen Ölbaum gefesselt gezeigt, seit dem 15. Jahrhundert auch mit auf den Kopf genagelten Händen. Pantaleon gilt als Schutzpatron der Ärzte, Ammen und Hebammen und wird bei Kopfschmerzen, Auszehrung, Verlassenheit, Viehkrankheiten sowie bei Heuschreckenplagen um Hilfe angerufen.

Kirchen, die dem Heiligen geweiht wurden und seinen Namen tragen, gibt es in Europa – und zwar in Deutschland, Österreich, der Schweiz, Italien, Griechenland, Mazedonien, Tschechien, Serbien, Polen, Bulgarien, Frankreich, Belgien, Großbritannien und Estland – sowie in Russland, Weißrussland und der Ukraine.

Literarische Bearbeitung

  • Konrad von Würzburg: Pantaleon. Bereinigter      diplomatischer Abdruck und Übersetzung. Hrsg., übersetzt und mit einem      Nachwort versehen von Thomas Neukirchen. Erich Schmidt Verlag, Berlin 2008      (Texte des späten Mittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit, Bd. 45). ISBN      978-3-503-09848-4.

Literatur

Weblinks

 Commons: Pantaleon – Sammlung von Bildern, Videos und AudiodateienFranziskanerkloster Vierzehnheiligen über Pantaleon

Einzelnachweise

· Johann Samuel Ersch, Johann Gottfried Gruber (Hrsg.) Allgemeine Encyklopädie der Wissenschaften und Künste in alphabetischer Folge. Dritte Section O - Z. Theil 10, Pales - Panus. Leipzig 1838, S. 440f

· · Wolfgang Achnitz (Hrsg.): Deutsches Literatur-Lexikon. Das Mittelalter. Band 2: Das geistliche Schrifttum des Spätmittelalters. Walter de Gruyter, Berlin – New York 2010, S. 177

· · Hans Joachim Kracht: Geschichte der Benediktinerabtei St. Pantaleon in Köln 965-1250 (Studien zur Kölner Kirchengeschichte Bd. 11). Schmitt Verlag, Siegburg 1975, ISBN 3-87710-067-8, S. 11.

· · Stefan Samerski: Die Kölner Pantaleonsverehrung. Kontext – Funktion – Entwicklung (Forschungen zur Volkskunde Heft 51). Books on Demand, Norderstedt 2005, ISBN 3-8334-3041-9, S. 13–15.

· · Stefan Samerski: Die Kölner Pantaleonsverehrung. Kontext – Funktion – Entwicklung (Forschungen zur Volkskunde Heft 51). Books on Demand, Norderstedt 2005, ISBN 3-8334-3041-9, S. 52–59.

· · Hans Joachim Kracht: Geschichte der Benediktinerabtei St. Pantaleon in Köln 965-1250 (Studien zur Kölner Kirchengeschichte Bd. 11). Schmitt Verlag, Siegburg 1975, ISBN 3-87710-067-8, S. 14.

· · Fredy Meyer: Sankt Pelagius und Gregor der Grosse. Ihre Verehrung im Bistum Konstanz (Forschungen zur oberrheinischen Landesgeschichte Bd. 47). Alber, Freiburg, München 2002, ISBN 3-495-49946-6, S. 287.

· · Hans Joachim Kracht: Geschichte der Benediktinerabtei St. Pantaleon in Köln 965-1250 (Studien zur Kölner Kirchengeschichte Bd. 11). Schmitt Verlag, Siegburg 1975, ISBN 3-87710-067-8, S. 90–91.

· Singular anárgyros (ανάργυρος), wörtlich: „geldlos“, abgeleitet von griechisch árgyros (άργυρος) = Silber, Gel

 

 

                                                                       

Maria, wood;; 18th cent. H. 50 cm; with approval of protestant cleric; 


Goa/philippine; wood, bone




Reliquary; H. 56 x 35 x 18cm

A GILT AND POLYCHROME CARVED LIMEWOOD RELIQUARY BUST OF A FEMALE SAINT

NORTH ITALIAN OR AUSTRIAN, LATE 17TH/EARLY 18TH CENTURY

 Christies Amsterdam september 2009, lot 61

A GILT AND POLYCHROME CARVED LIMEWOOD RELIQUARY BUST OF A FEMALE SAINT
North Italian or Austrian, late 17th/early 18th century
With nimbus and central oval opening to enclose a reliquary, on a square plexiglass plinth and steel stand; overall some losses and chips to the decoration, the surface slightly dirty
50 cm + 6. high  

Bust reliquaries for the skulls of saints occasionally contained additional relics behind glazed medallions or in the bases. Made of blocks of oak and carved in the round, the four shown here were probably meant to be carried in processions; at other times they may have been placed on an altar dedicated to the saint. Although their style suggests that they were made in Brabant and possibly Brussels, some of the total group of twenty-three related busts could have been carved in Spain by Brabantine sculptors. According to tradition, Emperor Charles v (1500-1558) donated similar pieces to Spanish churches-a fact that might explain the examples in this style that have a Spanish provenance.

spanish 12.08.13; 19th cent. H 39 c


 St Paulus the heremite; 16th cent, lower rhine; H. 81 cm; wood polychromend .

A Lower Rhenish oak figure of Saint Paul the Hermit late 16th century of oak, gilt and coloured green



Mourn for Jezus; bronze; H. 22 cm



 Ambrosius   17th cent. H. 86 cm

 


 Bartolomeus; Flanders; 15th cent. H. 38 cm; oak;


ECCE HOMO Oak wood, 'schmerzenmann' 'pain man'; in research 

 



Christ sepulture;  wood, polychrome 17th cent. H. 48 cm; 07.12.2009  ; retable;

Retabel (altarpiece); A fine Netherlandish oak relief of the Entombment of Christ

Late 16th centuryshowing the body of Christ surrounded by Mary,   before the tomb instruments of the Passion; piece with Nikodemus and Joseph von Arimathia and two women is from the late 16th century. I don't  for sure if it is from Antwerp, but from the Southern Netherlands. The former context was an altarpiece

lit.: Merken opmerken; C. van Vlierden , H de Smedt 1990; p.144>>213; ill; Antwerpse retabels, 15de-16de eeuw; catalogus; Hans Nieuwdorp; 1993





albaster


st anna te drieen (selbtrit)   provenance: bought at Glerum Auction as 15th cent. collection M.C. Jungling-Windt, the Hague; Oak 50x24 cm; re-assesment by scholars: 19th cent, Flemish?